Friday, November 30, 2007

Another Article Documents Decline of Tenure

In the midst of an incredibly hectic week, I am sneaking in a post. Here is an article from the New York Times. Although there doesn't seem to be anything in particular driving its appearance, it notes that the shift from tenure-track appointments to limited-term ones continues apace.

My favorite bit from the article is this:

Dr. Ehrenberg and a colleague analyzed 15 years of national data and found that graduation rates declined when public universities hired large numbers of contingent faculty.

Several studies of individual universities have determined that freshmen taught by many part-timers were more likely to drop out.


These two statistics should be more prominently displayed. There is a real impact on students--not just the institution or the teachers--when the type of teacher changes!

2 comments:

Anonymous said...

No surprise there. Given the crappy pay most part time faculty recieve it is hard to imagine them putting as much time and effort into teaching.

Furthermore, most part time instructors are going to be local. That means a very small pool to recruit from. Sometimes a department will get lucky and find someone local with an appropriate degree and is a good teacher. Other times its a case of, "well he or she is the only candidate with the right degree so we have to hire that person or leave the position unfilled."

Justin Mitchell said...

Unrelated, but I thought you would enjoy the title of this report:

NEW REPORT REVEALS MOST EXPENSIVE COLLEGES WITH
HIGHEST PAID PRESIDENTS AND LARGEST GOVERNMENT SUBSIDIES SCORE THE WORST ON BASIC U.S. HISTORY TEST

http://www.americancivicliteracy.org/resources/content/failing_america_9-18-07.pdf