Tuesday, January 31, 2006

How To Fight RateMyProfessors.com

I mentioned rate my students a few weeks ago, and so here is a continuation of the discussion with an article calling for more public information about teaching evaluations.

I think that this is a good idea. I don't understand why some faculty members here are afraid of written comments.

As you remember, last year, the faculty senate voted to remove comments from our evaluation forms in the wake of a request from a mother of a student to see the results. Outside of obscene and degrading comments (which is what ratemyprofessors.com has become), it would be better if all the info were available to students.

I see comments as an important source of improving my teaching, without them, our evaluation system is a completely irrellevent exercise.

This is what the article argues, though I would disagree with his premise that students should be seen as consumers. It is a resonant analogy, but incorrect in terms of the relationship between teachers and students.


Inside Higher Ed :: How To Fight RateMyProfessors.com

3 comments:

Lammers said...

You wrote:
>>though I would disagree with his premise that students should be seen as consumers. It is a resonant analogy, but incorrect in terms of the relationship between teachers and students.<<

That is exactly correct. A consumer gets what he wants. A student gets what he *needs.*

I also agree with your comments on written comments on SOS forms. I find them very helpful.

I also must say that I feel all comments about me on ratemyprofessor.com have been fair and honest.

Lake Winneblogo said...

Thanks for your comments. (Though I thought you said you wouldn't read the site because I was anonymous!?)

I haven't honestly looked at my comments. I have just been following the debate from afar. I suppose I should check . . .

That is nice to hear, however, that you are getting fair comments. It doesn't sound like others feel the same.

Lammers said...

I still feel that an anonymous blog is WRONG and deserves no more respect than an unsigned letter-to-the-editor or anonymous telephone calls. As long as I take responsibility for my own opinions, however, my conscience is clear.